Hummus

Tue, Jul 1 • 0

A middle-eastern favorite.

2 cans garbonzo beans, reserving the liquid from one
4 cloves of garlic
¼ c tahini paste
juice from ½ lemon
1 package Adobo seasoning
1 T salt
pepper to taste

In a food processor, get the blades going, and drop in the garlic until it’s finely chopped. Add the chick peas, lemon juice, tahini, adobo, salt and pepper, and blend, adding the reserved chick pea liquid until a smooth paste is formed, scraping down the sides.

Transfer to a serving bowl, drizzle with olive oil and smoked paprika, and serve with crudite and/or pita bread.

Option 1 : Roast some fresh hot peppers over a flame, and put into a plastic bag to steam for 10 minutes, or when cool enough to handle. Remove burnt skin, and slice open to remove seeds. Add the remaining flesh after you’ve chopped the garlic.


White Bean Mash

Sat, Jun 14 • 0

An easy dinner side dish comes together in less than 10 minutes.

1 large clove of garlic, chopped
1 can cannellini
(white kidney) beans, drained

In a sauce pan, heat up some oil, and lightly fry the chopped garlic. Add the beans, and let them heat up. Then, with the back of a wooden spoon, mash the beans to form a paste. Season with some salt and pepper.


Zucchini with Scallions and Mint

Sat, Jun 14 • 0

A tasty recipe to use up all the squash for your garden.

I saw this on Lidia Bastianich’s cooking program on PBS. It’s surprisingly delicious. (You should know, though, that boiling vinegar will leave a lingering, though not completely unpleasant odor.)

½ c white wine vinegar
3 medium green zucchini, sliced
6 scallions, cut into 1″ pieces
fresh mint leaves, chopped

In a small saucepan, bring the vinegar to a boil, and reduce by half. In large frying pan, sauté the scallions in a little hot oil. Add the zucchini, and allow it to brown on both sides. Add the reduced vinegar and toss to coat each slice. Remove from heat, and add chopped mint leaves. Salt and pepper to taste. Serve warm or at room temperature.


Corn on the Cob

Sun, May 4 • 1

As far as I’m concerned, there are only two ways to make corn on the cob … the good way, and the better way.

The good way has you boiling a pot of water with a handful of salt and a handful of sugar, and once the water is at a full boil, you put in the shucked corn, let it boil for 5 minutes, and then turn off the heat, and let it steep for another 7 to 10.

The better way to do it has you put the corn, husk and all, on the grill, turning every few minutes, for 15 minutes. This will give you a delicious smoky flavor, and the corn silk will come right off. (Some people dunk the ears of corn in water first to prevent burning. I actually like the husks to char a bit, for the flavor.)

In either case, slather it with butter and kosher salt.

I’ve read suggestions that you can cook corn in the microwave, wrapping the corn in plastic wrap, and steaming it in the husk. I’ve tried it with very mixed results, so I generally stick to the two methods above.


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