Recent Food Neologisms

Sun, Jan 10 • 0

A look at some of the new words and phrases about food.

Foodoir n. A memoir that includes recipes or that is focused on food, meals, or cooking. [Blend of food and memoir.]

Whole Foods Republicans n. “Independent-minded voters who embrace a progressive lifestyle but not progressive politics. These highly-educated individuals appreciate diversity and would never tell racist or homophobic jokes; they like living in walkable urban environments; they believe in environmental stewardship, community service and a spirit of inclusion. And yes, many shop at Whole Foods, which has become a symbol of progressive affluence but is also a good example of the free enterprise system at work.”

Koodie n. slang. A kid keenly interested in food, especially eating, cooking or watching reruns of Julia Child. A kid who has an ardent or refined interest in food; a mini-gourmet; usually trained by one or both parents to have an unusual, and sometimes fanatic, desire to eat unusual foods. Evolution from the now defunct word “foodie.”

TweetWhatYouEat, n. (commonly known as “twye“). A Twitter application that helps people track what they eat, thereby encouraging them to eat more healthily.

Men-tertainers n. an increasing number of males are spending their free time organising dinner parties for their friends.

Courtesy of The Double-tongued Dictionary, Word Spy, and Schott’s Vocab.


August Food Related Neologisms

Mon, Aug 31 • 0

A monthly look at new words and phrases about food.

rito n. A clipping of burrito. “I just got out of a noise violation because the cop recognized my roommate as his favorite chipotle burrito roller. just another reason I love ritos.”

weed in a can n. Drank” is being billed as the anti-energy drink, to help you relax and soothe out the day. The key ingredients in the grape-flavored drink are melatonin, valerian root and rose hip. Those are all herbs used to help in relaxation and trouble sleeping. The concept of the “relaxation beverage,” has led some people to refer to the drink as “weed in a can.” (Not to be confused with Purple drank, which is the slang term for a recreational drug popular in the hip-hop community of the southern United States. Its main ingredient is prescription-strength cough syrup containing codeine and promethazine.

vampire n. A traditional dish in the Republic of Chad in central Africa that is made with animal blood. “Vampire,” as it is jokingly dubbed, is making a comeback amid a global surge in food prices that has left meat too expensive for many. It is made with peppers, salt, onions, spicy sauce and maggi [stock cubes], and then fried together. Some nutritional specialists say that “vampire” is a good source of nutrients and protein, especially for children. One local was enthusiastic about its culinary merits too, stating: “The taste is good, a bit like liver. I really like it. … I suppose it doesn’t sound very good to be associated with sucking blood, but I don’t really care. Perhaps it will give me the strength of a vampire!”

Courtesy of The Double-tongued Dictionary, Word Spy, and Schott’s Vocab.


Foodie Lexicon, May ’09

Sun, May 31 • 0

bogo acronym In the retail industry that stands for Buy One Get One. “Unfortunately, the bogo deals tend to favor families with more mouths to feed than ours. What am I going to do with a second ham?”

bet dieting pp. Betting money on losing weight, particularly where the money goes to a charity or other organization that one disagrees with. “Bet dieting is the newest rage and there are a few websites that enable it, but stickk.com has an extra ploy: the ‘anti-charity.’ Choosing the most politically controversial non-profit charities to motivate someone to achieve their goals is a great idea. Science and the stock market know that risk is a much more powerful motivator than reward.

medible n. Food containing marijuana. marijuana + edible. “Eating edibles (often referred to as Medibles) gives some suffers of chronic ailments more relief or a different kind of relief than simply smoking or vaporizing it.”

jacket fries n.pl. They’re what some restaurants call “jacket fries”: oblong slices of fried skin-on Idaho potato. “Crisp at the edges but thick enough to be fluffy in the middle, they’re a lovely hybrid of chip and french fry that’s worth the 75-cent upgrade from the standard crinkle-cut fries.”

veggiedag n. The Belgian term for a day upon which people abstain from meat – literally, “veggie day.” Officials in the Belgian city of Ghent are to forgo meat once a week (on Thursdays) in an acknowledgment of livestock farming’s detrimental effect on the environment. “The UN says livestock is responsible for nearly one-fifth of global greenhouse gas emissions, hence Ghent’s declaration of a weekly ‘veggie day.’ Public officials and politicians will be the first to give up meat for a day. Schoolchildren will follow suit with their own veggiedag in September.”

eco-kosher adj. The trend among some kosher-keeping Jews to eat only food that has been ethically, sustainably and, where possible, locally sourced. “The book of Leviticus requires that meat come from animals that chew their cud and have split hooves in order to be considered kosher. But for eco-kosher Jews, those laws have come to represent only part of the equation.”

credit munch n. Recession-prompted comfort eating. “There is an apparent correlation between dwindling finances and expanding waistlines. Stressed-out Britons have piled on 20 million stone in a year trying to ‘comfort eat’ their way through the recession. The condition – dubbed the credit munch – has seen three-in-five Britons put on weight in the past 12 months. The term has also been used to describe a trend for bringing home-prepared lunches to work.

cookprint n. What do you call the impact you make on the planet when you cook? It’s your “cookprint“— the entire chain of resources used to prepare meals, and the waste produced in the process.

Courtesy of The Double-tongued Dictionary, Word Spy, and Schott’s Vocab.


Foodie Lexicon, April ’09

Fri, May 1 • 0

A monthly look at new words and phrases about food.

Citrus Fruit Conspiracy n. A theory proposed by an Iranian official to explain how Israeli citrus fruit were (illegally) imported into Iran. “The media showcased the contraband citrus, the warehouses where it was stored were shut down, and the authorities pledged to bring to justice the miscreants involved. A senior Iranian politician even accused the opposition of a citrus fruit conspiracy.”

Georgia ice cream n. Rogers merely shifted the ideas that worked at Toddle House, such as waffles with pecans, into the Waffle House concept. He always served lots of grits, which Rogers likes to call “Georgia ice cream.”

cheat meal n. By setting aside one day a week to eat junk food or whatever you want you take control of your cravings and eat on your terms. This is often referred to as a cheat mealbecause you are deliberately cheating on you diet. This is a method of rewarding yourself for eating well during the rest of the week and provides a much needed psychological boost.

black and pink n. Pity the coffee vendor in New York who doesn’t know that a black and pink means a black coffee with a packet of saccharin.

Courtesy of The Double-tongued Dictionary and Schott’s Vocab.


Foodie Jargon, Feb. ’09

Sat, Feb 28 • 0

meatza n. My friends once ate a pizza that was known in legend as “the meatza.” This pizza had no sauce, just 7 or 8 different meats piled quite high (estimated at about 4-5 inches). They then used the crust to mop up the grease that had dripped off the slices as they ate.

mylk n. Making almond milk is incredibly easy once you get your system down and my kids think it is incredibly delicious. They will drink it straight, add it to cereal, or use it to make chocolate milk or banana milk smoothies. Since I use raw organic almonds, I get to rest easy knowing that their milk, or “mylk” as many refer to it, is healthier for their little bodies and healthier for the planet.

trub n. Don’t worry about all of the junk (hops and proteins—called the “trub” in brewers lingo) in the wort—most of it will fall to the bottom during fermentation.

Courtesy of The Double-Tongued Dictionary.


Foodie Jargon, Jan ’09

Sat, Jan 31 • 0

bilingual adj. Out of the types of celestial seasoning tea, the bilingual teas seem to appeal mostly to Hispanic communities. These teas are called bilingual because they mix two different flavor like banana and apple, or cinnamon and apple, or honey and lemon, and so on.

belly wadding n. In the cowboy movies we often see cow punchers and gunfighters pull out what appears to be a short strip of leather and chew away on it—somewhat of a substitute for ribs and beans when they were on the trail or when there was a lull in dodging bullets. Some of the cowboys referred to it as “belly wadding.”

sugar hat n. The key is to find a sugar cone (also known as a “sugar hat”) which is a solid piece of white sugar that you can flame.

murphy style n. I ask this question in the Christmas section because you always see gift packs with coffee beans and it’s not instant coffee. And I am always worried that the gift receipient doesn’t have a coffee maker. Yes, you can make it “murphy style” or some refer to it as cowboy or camp side style. Just use the ground bean and a pot of water, bring to a boil and let the grounds settle.

oyster n. Tuck the knife behind the ball and cut the leg free. As you cut past the socket joint, don’t forget to arc the knife around the little pocket of meat known in birds as the “oyster,” as this is the best part. The oyster is small in wild ducks, but is very large in turkeys, geese and pheasants.

ham fat musician n. He went from being a “ham fat” musician (a term for amateur players in reference to young trombonists greasing their slides with lard) to a professional.

pizza stone n. Baking stone: A stone creates a more even temperature and the crunchy-chewy crust that bakers seek. Also known as a pizza stone, this large porous tile can be left in the bottom of the oven at all times to even the heat.

white tablecloth restaurant n. An upscale or expensive restaurant, as opposed to a casual or fast-food restaurant. “I’m able to do coupons and help people who are on tight budgets who still want to go out to eat. It’s the Ruth Chris Steakhouses and the white tablecloth restaurants who will see an effect.”

yak n. Their discovery of cognac—“yak” as they affectionately call it—started a fashion among young black Americans who, in a practice considered heresy in France, mix it with fruit juices to make cocktails such as French Connection and Incredible Hulk. The rappers even wrote songs about Hennessy Cognac, referring to it as “Henny” or “Henn-dog.”

Courtesy of The Double-Tongued Dictionary.


Food Neologisms for December, ’08

Tue, Dec 30 • 0

“Bowl of red,” “Randall,” and “Sikparazzi.”

bowl of red n. The fact that a Texas “bowl of red,” as chili is commonly called, has no original relationship with past didn’t matter.

Randall n. Wayne decided to attach a bag of NZ Cascade hops to one of his taps- apparently this is referred to as a “Randall.” It created a crazy hoppy beer that got crazier as more beer was poured through it. After a few hours it just started smelling like a bag of hops straight out of the freezer.

sikparazzi n. Just as paparazzi follow Hollywood stars for a living, hoping to catch them slipping up on film—many so called “sikparazzi,” a combination of the Korean word for food and paparazzi, will be checking up on restaurants and food venders to detect unhygienic, inappropriate or fake ingredients, also in the hopes of a payday.

Lovingly culled from Double-Tongued Dictionary.


More Food-related Neologisms

Mon, Dec 8 • 0

post-off pricing n. Washington state requires producers and distributors to post their pricing to a central database maintained by the state’s liquor control board. When these producers and distributors post discounts, that is called “post-off pricing.”

bliss point n. Faced with insistent demands to lower the salt, food companies employ three strategies. Strategy No. 1 is to try to reduce sodium. Manufacturers say they can’t do this easily. Unless products are salty enough—reaching what the industry calls the “bliss point”—people will not buy them.

health halo n. The other half of the Park Slopers were shown the same salad and drink plus two Fortt’s crackers prominently labeled “Trans Fat Free.” The crackers added 100 calories to the meal, bringing it to 1,034 calories, but their presence skewed people’s estimates in the opposite direction. The average estimate for the whole meal was only 835 calories—199 calories less than the actual calorie count, and 176 calories less than the average estimate by the other group for the same meal without crackers. Just as Dr. Chandon had predicted, the trans-fat-free label on the crackers seemed to imbue them with a health halo that magically subtracted calories from the rest of the meal.

mockolate n. Andy McShea is a Harvard-trained molecular biologist using his scientific talent in Seattle to promote “true chocolate” and steer consumers away from inadvertently ingesting all that other brown sweet stuff he says is often unhealthy, morally questionable and not the real thing. “We like to call it “mockolate’” said McShea, his British accent rising with indignation. “Most of the stuff sold as chocolate out in the world today is not really chocolate.”

Find more new words at Double-Tongued Dictionary.


More New Food Words

Fri, Aug 15 • 0

distavore n. To prove how wrong the farm-to-table movement is, I cooked a dinner purely of farm-to-airplane food. Nothing I made was grown within 3,000 miles of where I live in Los Angeles.…My distavore meal was more a smorgasbord than a smart fusion of cultures, but I still ate the way only a very rich person could have dined just 15 years ago.

cuisine trail n. A plan to authorize more cuisine trails, including as many as 10 “apple trails” and 10 trails that could include several different foods and wines. The idea is to boost tourism and agriculture products.

Gastrosexuals n. Dubbed ‘Gastrosexuals,’ this new generation of men consider cooking more a hobby than a household chore and use their kitchen prowess to impress friends and prospective partners. (dailymail.co.uk)

chop-up n. Mr. Albarn brought them as well into the revue, or the “chop-up,” as he called it—a Nigerian term for a feast.

For more neologisms, and not just food related, visit The Double-Tongued Dictionary.


More Recent Food Neologisms

Thu, Jul 10 • 0

“Family Meal,” “Haji Stove,” “Sad” Dumplings, & “Bathtub Cheese”

family meal n.I had arrived at 4 p.m. to experience a daily ritual that takes place in hundreds of restaurants across the city, and in thousands more across the country: family meal. Chanterelle was the last stop on a month-long, eight-venue culinary tour of Manhattan. My mission was simple: to see how a restaurant, with seemingly endless talent and resources in the kitchen, nourishes its staff, and how that 20-minute meal impacts the seven hours of dinner service that follows.”

haji stove n. “The chai itself is usually green, but sometimes will be black. It is made by putting the tea leaves in the pot and boiling the water, often on a burner sitting directly atop a propane cylinder. If they are making shiir chai (milk tea) the leaves are put into the milk directly and the milk is not quite boiled. The propane rigs are commonly referred to in American parlance as haji stoves.

sad adj. “For Cathy Riddle, another Appalachian Fair champion who uses White Lily for everything from green tomato bread to sad dumplings (the kind with a chewy center), the selling point is consistent good results.”

bathtub cheese n.The germ can infect anyone who eats contaminated fresh cheeses sold by street vendors, smuggled across the Mexican border or produced by families who try to make a living selling so-called bathtub cheese made in home tubs and backyard troughs.”

Courtesy of Double-Tongued Dictionary


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